Course Descriptions

Proposed Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

The doctor of pharmacy curriculum at the Stony Brook University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SPPS) is designed to prepare students to serve as contemporary, compassionate, creative, and scholarly pharmacy practitioners, educators, researchers, and leaders in the advancement of the pharmacy profession. It provides the educational foundation for an entry-level pharmacy practitioner. The curriculum consists of courses in basic biomedical sciences, clinical sciences, pharmaceutical sciences, and pharmacy practice. A significant segment of the coursework is taken together with the medical and dental medicine students. The courses taken together with other health sciences students include didactic, lecture-based coursework, but, it also includes clinical, laboratory, and active learning opportunities (i.e., team-based learning). The coursework is integrated with progressive patient-centered practice experiences with a focus centered on educating entry-level practitioners capable of providing care.


 

Fall Professional Year 1

Becoming a Pharmacist (2 SCH = Student Credit Hours)

This course is designed to provide students foundational knowledge, skills and resources necessary to the pharmacy practice environment. An emphasis will be placed on the initial steps in providing patient-centered care, development of professionalism, understanding the medication use process and pharmacist’s role on a health care team to promote health and disease prevention. The laboratory component is designed to reinforce the patient-centered care, medication use process and ability to work on a health care team. This course will involve interprofessional activities with the medical and dental school.

Evidence-based Medicine and Literature Evaluation (2 SCH)

This course focuses on developing skills needed to ensure the rational and safe use of medication through effective use of the medical literature. Skills include identifying resources to answer clinical questions, developing search strategies, and critically evaluating scientific literature allowing students to identify and utilize the best evidence to make decisions regarding patient care. In addition students will be introduced to the concept of “journal club” as a way of discussing and evaluating recently published research and its application to pharmacy practice.

Fundamentals of Drug Action. (4 SCH)

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of medicinal chemistry including drug-structure relationships, properties of the functional groups and factors contributing to drug metabolism, potency and drug-drug interaction. It provides the foundation for students to understand formulation, dosage forms, drug delivery systems, pharmaceutical calculations as well as the principles of pharmacokinetic modeling. Students will also gain an understanding on essential principles of pharmacology including receptor binding, dose response and the principles of autonomic nervous system.

Self-care and Nonprescription Therapeutics - 1 (2 SCH) 

An introduction to self-care therapeutics including nonprescription products, complementary and alternative medicines, and vitamins. Students will learn a systematic approach to assessing, triaging and treating self-limiting conditions. Basic causes, signs and symptoms, proper counseling on self-care products will be discussed. Students explore the regulatory processes regarding over-the-counter medications, examine the impact of self-care on the US health care system, and identify and use reliable drug information resources that are available to both patients and pharmacists. Skills-based applications are designed to develop abilities needed to assess, triage and treat self-limiting conditions. Interprofessional experiences are incorporated into the course.

Spring Professional Year 1

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 1 (4 SCH)
This course examines those topics that provide the foundation for the rational use of pharmacotherapeutic agents in treating select cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal disorders. The pathophysiology of these systems are discussed along with actions of the pharmacological agents used in the treatment of cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal disorders. The process of choosing the optimal therapeutic regimen based on individual patient characteristics, pharmacokinetics and demonstrated benefits and risks of drug therapy will be discussed. Clinical and statistical evaluation of literature will be utilized in pharmacotherapeutic decisions. Monitoring the effectiveness of the selected therapy and identifying and solving drug related problems will also be emphasized.

Self-care and Nonprescription Therapeutics - 2 (2 SCH) 

The second course in self-care therapeutics including nonprescription products, complementary and alternative medicines, and vitamins. Students will learn a systematic approach to assessing, triaging and treating self-limiting conditions. Basic causes, signs and symptoms, proper counseling on self-care products will be discussed. Students will explore the regulatory processes regarding over-the-counter medications, examine the impact of self-care on the US health care system, and identify and use reliable drug information resources that are available to both patients and pharmacists. Skills-based applications are designed to further develop abilities to assess, triage and treat self-limiting conditions.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Community 1 (0- SCH)

The purpose and design of this first community IPPE are to help the student transition from didactic courses to the practice of pharmacy in the community setting. The goals of this experience are to expose the student to: the daily activities of a community pharmacist, identify the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting and prepare the student for future community IPPEs. Under the supervision of a pharmacist and through structured activities and assignments, the student will become familiar with the following: structure, organization and technology used in this setting and processes involved in record keeping, inventory management, and third party billing, preparation and dispensing of prescriptions, become more familiar with health and wellness products, and utilize appropriate and effective communication skills to speak with patients, caregivers and health care providers.

The student will also begin to explore the concepts of professionalism and shared accountabilities for health care outcomes and enhance their critical thinking skills.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Institutional 1 (0- SCH)

The purpose and design of this first institutional IPPE is to help the student transition from didactic courses to their first institution experiential setting. The goals of this experience are to expose the student to: the daily activities of an institutional pharmacist, recognize the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting and prepare the student for future institutional IPPEs. Under the supervision of a pharmacist and through structured activities and assignments, the student will become familiar with the following: structure, organization, technology and processes involved in record keeping, inventory management, procurement and storage of medications used in this setting, medication use processes and the role of technology to enhance patient safety, dispensing, preparation and compounding of medications utilizing appropriate calculations, the medication reconciliation process, identification of drug information resources, and recognition of effective communication skills needed to communicate with health care providers.

The student will enhance their critical thinking skills and learn how to apply them in this setting.

Fall Professional Year 2

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 2 (3 SCH)

This course examines those topics that provide the foundation for the rational use of pharmacotherapeutic agents in treating select neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiology of these systems are discussed along with actions of the pharmacological agents used in the treatment of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The process of choosing the optimal therapeutic regimen based on individual patient characteristics and demonstrated benefits and risks of drug therapy will be discussed. Clinical and statistical evaluation of literature will be utilized in pharmacotherapeutic decisions. Monitoring the effectiveness of the selected therapy and identifying and solving drug related problems will also be emphasized.

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 3 (5 SCH)

This course examines those topics that provide the foundation for the rational use of pharmacotherapeutic agents in treating select endocrine, OB-GYN, GI, GU, nutritional and musculoskeletal, immunologic and dermatologic disorders. The pathophysiology of these systems are discussed along with actions of the pharmacological agents used in the treatment endocrine, OB-GYN, GI, GU, nutritional and musculoskeletal, immunologic and dermatologic disorders. The process of choosing the optimal therapeutic regimen based on individual patient characteristics and demonstrated benefits and risks of drug therapy will be discussed. Monitoring the effectiveness of the selected therapy and identifying and solving drug related problems will also be emphasized.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Community 2 (0 SCH)

The purpose and design of this IPPE are to help the student further their community practice skills by utilizing their knowledge attained in completed didactic courses and skills learned in their first community IPPE. In this IPPE, the student will have the pharmacy practice privileges afforded by obtaining a New York State pharmacy intern permit. The goals of this experience are to have the student participate in: the daily activities of a community pharmacist and utilize the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting. Under the supervision of a pharmacist and through structured activities and assignments, the student will participate and become more competent in the following: preparation and dispensing of prescriptions in accordance with NY State law, counsel patients on prescription medications, procurement and storage of controlled medications, utilization of various medication use systems and the role of technology to enhance patient safety, execute health and wellness services, and practice professional behavior. The student will continue to expand drugs and diseases knowledge, and enhance their critical thinking skills.

Spring Professional Year 2

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 4 (4 SCH)

This course examines those topics that provide the foundation for the rational use of pharmacotherapeutic agents in toxicology, treating miscellaneous diseases, and special populations. The pathophysiology of these systems are discussed along with actions of the pharmacological agents used in the treatment of selected diseases. The process of choosing the optimal therapeutic regimen based on individual patient characteristics, pharmacokinetics and demonstrated benefits and risks of drug therapy will be discussed. Clinical and statistical evaluation of literature will be used in pharmacotherapeutic decisions. Monitoring the effectiveness of the selected therapy and identifying and solving drug related problems will also be emphasized.

Pharmaceutics 1 (3 SCH)

This course is intended to provide a foundation in the principles, which are fundamental to the study of pharmaceutics and drug delivery, including physical pharmacy and dosage form design. Students will learn about the design, composition and proper use of dosage forms, including manufactured commercial products for the mass market and extemporaneously compounded preparations for individual patients. An emphasis will be placed on how to compound solid, liquid, and semi-solid dosage forms.

Applied Pharmaceutics 1 (1 SCH)

This course is the laboratory associated with Pharmaceutics I and will provide students with an opportunity to apply knowledge gained in pharmaceutics lectures to practical situations. The student will also develop the skills needed for the preparation and dispensing of pharmaceutical solution, emulsion, suspension, semi-solid, and solid dosage forms with emphasis on the selection of excipients for extemporaneous compounding. Prescription reading, pharmacy calculations, and an opportunity for patient counseling in the use of the compounded product will also be implemented.

Pharmacy Administration: Managing Practice and Personnel (3 SCH)

This course covers basic management principles involved in pharmacy practices from manufacturing to the consumer. Management theories, marketing strategies, regulatory issues, contracts, accounting concepts, and pharmacy security are some of the issues covered throughout the course. Drug evaluation, processing, drug acquisition, inventory, and storage will also be discussed. In addition, human resource management, including selection, performance appraisal, and diversity issues will be covered.

Principles of Pharmacoeconomics (3 SCH) 

Value-based decision-making in pharmacy practice prepares pharmacists and student pharmacists to analyze and interpret results of pharmacoeconomic and health outcome studies. The measurement of economic, humanistic and clinical outcomes will be discussed including cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost/benefit analyses and quality of life.

Health Care Systems and Informatics (3 SCH)

The course introduces student pharmacist to the organization, financing, and access challenges of the healthcare system in the United States as well as the role of technology in healthcare. This course will describe the complex structure and function of the various private and public health care entities within the United States, including how quality, cost, access, and technology influence patient care. The unique contribution of pharmacy, pharmacists, and pharmacy systems in public health, quality improvement, and patient safety will be discussed with an emphasis on pharmacist provided programs and services. Current health care reform and other emerging issues will be debated.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Community 3 (0 SCH)

The purpose and design of this IPPE are to help the student further their community practice skills by utilizing their knowledge attained in completed didactic courses and continue to transition these skills to the practice of pharmacy in the community setting. The goals of this experience are to have the student participate in: the daily activities of a community pharmacist and utilize the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting. Under the supervision of a pharmacist and through structured activities and assignments, the student will participate and improve their skills in the following activities: preparation and dispensing of prescriptions in accordance with NY State law and perform any necessary calculations required, development and maintenance of patient medication profiles, execute health and wellness self-care services, and utilize appropriate drug information resources and effective communication skills to counsel patients and speak to caregivers and health care providers. The student will continue to expand drugs and diseases knowledge, enhance their skills in critical thinking, communication, and professionalism.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Institutional 2 (0 SCH)

The purpose and design of this IPPE are to help the student further their practice skills by utilizing their knowledge attained in completed didactic courses and skills learned in their first institution IPPE. The goals of this experience are to have the student participate in: the daily activities of an institutional pharmacist and recognize the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting. Under the supervision of a pharmacist and through structured activities and assignments, the student will participate and become more familiar with the following: record keeping and inventory management, preparation and dispensing of medications and perform any necessary calculations, utilization of the PPCP, utilization of appropriate drug references and effective communication skills needed to provide medication reconciliation and discharge counseling. The student will continue to explore the concepts of professionalism and shared accountabilities for health care outcomes, expand drugs and diseases knowledge, and enhance their critical thinking skills, metacognition, and professionalism.

Fall Professional Year 3

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 5 (4 SCH) 

This course examines those topics that provide the foundation for the rational use of pharmacotherapeutic agents in treating infectious diseases. The pathophysiology of these systems are discussed along with actions of the pharmacological agents used in the treatment of treating infectious disease. The process of choosing the optimal therapeutic regimen based on individual patient characteristics, pharmacokinetics and demonstrated benefits and risks of drug therapy will be discussed. Clinical and statistical evaluation of literature will be used in pharmacotherapeutic decisions. Monitoring the effectiveness of the selected therapy and identifying and solving drug related problems will also be emphasized.

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 6 (5 SCH)

This course examines those topics that provide the foundation for the rational use of pharmacotherapeutic agents in treating hematologic disorders, cancer, and transplantation. The pathophysiology of these systems are discussed along with actions of the pharmacological agents used in the treatment of hematologic disorders, cancer, and transplantation. The process of choosing the optimal therapeutic regimen based on individual patient characteristics and/or pharmacokinetic parameters and demonstrated benefits and risks of drug therapy will be discussed. Clinical and statistical evaluation of literature will be used in pharmacotherapeutic decisions. Monitoring the effectiveness of the selected therapy and identifying and solving drug related problems will also be emphasized.

Pharmacoepidemiology and Population-based Care (2 SCH)

Pharmacoepidemiology and Population-based Care describes cause-and-effect patterns of health and disease in large populations that advance safe and effective drug use and positive care outcomes within those populations. Student pharmacists will be able to evaluate the result of a study and evaluate if the author’s interpretation is correct. Student pharmacists will be able to report an adverse event to the correct agency if one should occur in their practice. Clinical and statistical evaluation of literature will be utilized in pharmacotherapeutic decisions.

Pharmaceutics 2 (3 SCH)

Pharmacoepidemiology and Population-based Care describes cause-and-effect patterns of health and disease in large populations that advance safe and effective drug use and positive care outcomes within those populations. Student pharmacists will be able to evaluate the result of a study and evaluate if the author’s interpretation is correct. Student pharmacists will be able to report an adverse event to the correct agency if one should occur in their practice. Clinical and statistical evaluation of literature will be utilized in pharmacotherapeutic decisions.

Applied Pharmaceutics 2 (1 SCH) 

This course is the laboratory associated with Pharmaceutics 2 and provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge gained in pharmaceutics lectures to practical situations. The student develops the skills needed for the sterile and nonsterile preparation and dispensing of parenteral products, ophthalmic, otic, nasal and inhaled products. This course also emphasizes the preparation of special populations’ products and the handling of hazardous products. Prescription reading, pharmacy calculations, and an opportunity for patient counseling in the use of the compounded product is implemented.

Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Care (3 SCH)

This course provides an in-depth survey of the genetic basis of inter-subject variability in responses to drugs. It designed to enhance the students’ understanding and appreciation of drug efficacy and safety and the need and means to optimize these factors in pharmacotherapy. The genetic mechanisms/basis of polymorphisms in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of representative therapeutic drugs/drug classes are emphasized. The impact of epigenetics and environmental factors on the polymorphisms is also discussed.

Spring Professional Year 3

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 7 (2 SCH) 

This course is a case based integration of all aspects of pharmacy practice. It integrates US health care, cultural competency, economic issues, transition of care, ethics and medication delivery in the provision of quality patient care. The course utilizes complex patient cases involving multiple co-morbidities to ensure optimal patient care.

Pharmacy Law (1 SCH) 

This course examines the role of federal and state governments in the regulation of pharmacy practice and the interrelationship between federal and New York State pharmacy law, regulation and the practice act. Students will learn about both the structure and the substance of pharmacy practice environment.

Medication and Drug Distribution Safety Systems (2 SCH)

Medication and Drug Distribution Safety Systems identifies and helps student pharmacists reduce risks to patient safety and sources of medication errors. The topics include system, humanistic, organizational, and structure, process and outcomes of errors. Students also will be introduced to pharmacy outcome quality measures.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Community 4 (0 SCH)

The purpose and design of this IPPE are to help the student utilize their knowledge and skills developed in the didactic courses and continue to transition these skills to the practice of pharmacy in the community setting. The goals of this experience are to have the student participate in: the daily activities of a community pharmacist, utilize the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting and prepare the student for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs). Under the supervision of a pharmacist and through structured activities and assignments, the student will participate and continue to improve their skills in the following activities: preparation and dispensing of prescriptions in accordance with NY State law and perform any necessary calculations required, review medication profiles and resolve drug related problems, provide health and wellness services, understand public and private medication insurance options, and utilize appropriate drug information resources and effective communication skills to counsel patients and speak to caregivers and health care providers. The student will continue to enhance their skills in critical thinking, communication, metacognition, professionalism and entrepreneurship.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience Institutional 3 (0 SCH)

The purpose and design of this IPPE are to help the student utilize their expanded knowledge and skills attained in the didactic courses and continue to transition these skills to the practice of pharmacy in the institutional setting. The goals of this experience are to have the student participate in: the daily activities of an institutional pharmacist, utilize the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting and prepare the student for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs). Under the supervision of a pharmacist and through structured activities and assignments, the student will continue to improve their skills in the following activities: record keeping and inventory management and preparation and dispensing of medications, utilization of the PPCP, utilization of appropriate drug references, effective communication skills needed to provide medication reconciliation and discharge counseling, and the communication skills and confidence needed to present patient cases to health care providers. The student will continue to explore the concepts of professionalism and shared accountabilities for health care outcomes; expand drugs and diseases knowledge, and enhance their critical thinking skills, metacognition, and professionalism.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences 1-8 (5 SCH each)

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) provides the student with advanced skills in: clinical practice and judgement, a level of confidence and responsibility needed for independent and collaborative practice, communication with patients and other professionals, medication order processing in all practice settings, and the pharmacist’s patient care process. The SPPS will require 1600 APPE hours. ACPE requires advanced pharmacy practice experiences in four practice settings (ambulatory care, general medicine, health system, community), with the remainder in other practice settings that provide the student pharmacist with an opportunity to sample from the plethora of practice choices.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience - Inpatient (5 SCH)

The purpose and design of this APPE are to provide the student the opportunity to enhance their skills in the various roles of a pharmacist and how they contribute to patient care in this in-patient setting. Students will work in an inter-professional environment and provide medication management for patients with numerous and various diseases. They will also assist in improving medication management in transitions of care initiatives. Students will perform the following activities: apply evidence-based medicine practices to develop and optimize a pharmaceutical care plan; utilize pharmacokinetic dosing principles and monitor drug therapy; provide medication reconciliation with a focus on transitions of care and resolution of drug related problems; research and reply to drug information questions from health care providers; and interact appropriately with various health care providers on medical teams. The goals of this APPE are to have the student master competencies involved in the daily activities of an acute care pharmacist by utilizing the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting. This APPE will incorporate core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for new pharmacy graduates to assure students are practice ready upon graduation. EPAs, also known as units of work, will be defined through structured activities and assignments in the workbook that will include the following domains: patient provider, inter-professional team member, population health promoter, and information master.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience – Ambulatory Care (5 SCH)

The purpose and design of this APPE are to provide the student the opportunity to enhance their skills in various aspects of ambulatory care pharmacy practice. In this setting, students will manage and discuss multiple drug therapies with patients and various health care providers. Students will perform the following activities: collect patient specific information for optimization of medication therapy management, provide medication reconciliation and resolution of drug related problems; monitor drug therapy; communicate effectively to educate and counsel patients and their caregivers; research and reply to drug information questions from patients, caregivers, and health care providers; and interact appropriately with various health care providers on medical teams. The goals of this APPE are to have the student master competencies involved in the daily activities of an ambulatory care pharmacist by utilizing the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting. This APPE will incorporate core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for new pharmacy graduates to assure students are practice ready upon graduation. EPAs, also known as units of work, will be defined through structured activities and assignments in the workbook that will include the following domains: patient provider, inter-professional team member, population health promoter, and information master.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience – Community (5 SCH) 

The purpose and design of this APPE are to provide the student the opportunity to enhance their skills in various aspects of community pharmacy practice. Students will experience the role of the pharmacist in the delivery of health care services to patients in this setting. The emphasis is patient oriented drug therapy education utilizing effective communication skills. Students will perform the following activities: accurately and efficiently fill prescription orders; collect patient specific information for optimization of medication therapy management and resolution of drug related problems; respond to drug information questions; communicate effectively to counsel patients and their caregivers; and to explore and innovate new pharmacy business solutions that enhance the patient experience and strengthen the business of community pharmacy. The goals of this APPE are to have the student master competencies involved in the daily activities of a community pharmacist by utilizing the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting. This APPE will incorporate core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for new pharmacy graduates to assure students are practice ready upon graduation. EPAs, also known as units of work, will be defined through structured activities and assignments in the workbook that will include the following domains: patient provider, population health promoter, information master, and practice manager.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience – Health System (5 SCH)

The purpose and design of this APPE are to provide the student the opportunity to enhance their skills in various aspects of hospital/health-system pharmacy practice. Students will understand and develop their roles in various pharmaceutical operational initiatives that support pharmacy clinical services. Students will work with various pharmacy personnel in central distribution, decentralized pharmacy services, investigational drug services and pharmacy administration. Students will perform the following activities: order entry and verification, filling of automated dispensing cabinets including controlled substances monitoring systems, barcode medication identification, compounding of parenteral medications utilizing aseptic technique, review and develop patient electronic health record, and reply to drug information questions from health care providers. The goals of this APPE are to have the student master competencies involved in the daily activities of a health-system pharmacist by utilizing effective communication, relationship development and the principles of the pharmacists’ patient-care process (PPCP) in this setting. This APPE will incorporate core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for new pharmacy graduates to assure students are practice ready upon graduation. EPAs, also known as units of work, will be defined through structured activities and assignments in the workbook that will include the following domains: inter-professional team member, population health promoter, and practice manager.

Spring Professional Year 4

Integrated Pharmacotherapy 8 (4 SCH)

Student teams present clinical experiences from their Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences in a grand rounds type format. Students will present organ system diseases and content based on Tier 1 and Tier 2 topics identified in the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Toolkit. https://www.accp.com/docs/positions/misc/Toolkit_final.pdf. This course will be a case based integration of all aspects of pharmacy practice. The course will utilize complex patient cases involving multiple co-morbidities to ensure optimal patient care.

School of Pharmacy Courses Cross listed with Medical and/or Dental Medicine Schools.

Molecular Foundations of Medicine. [4 SCH]

Molecular Foundations of Medicine covers fundamental principles and concepts of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, and human genetics. The material in this course is presented within a framework of human health and disease. It provides the fundamental building blocks of knowledge for learning about pathology, pathophysiology and pharmacology, and is essential for future physicians, dentists and pharmacists.

Basic Mechanisms of Disease. [4 SCH]

The Basic Mechanisms of Disease is divided into several thematic areas: general mechanisms of disease including cell injury and repair, cell death, and environmental disease, neoplasia, including tissue changes in response to cancer, molecular mechanisms of cancer, carcinogenesis tumor invasion and metastasis, and tumor immunology; hematology, including components of hemostasis (control of the coagulation pathway including bleeding and thrombosis), components of blood, and pathophysiology of anemias, leukemia, lymphomas, and stem cell malignancies; and characteristics of diseases of the skin (dermatology) including inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic and pigment disorders.

Pathogens and Host Defenses. [5 SCH]
The Pathogens and Host Defense segment of Biomedical Building Blocks introduces students to the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system and the way in which they defend the host from disease caused by infectious agents. Students learn about the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites that cause disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts and fundamental aspects of the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. Students learn about the inflammatory response to tissue damage caused by infections and malfunctions of the immune system, and about other diseases with an immune basis. The course introduces the nature and causes of disease, death, reaction to injury, and repair. The course analyzes associated structural changes in cells and tissues, with reference to their functional correlates and adaptive arms of the immune system and the way in which they defend the host from disease caused by infectious agents.

Integrated Pathophysiology: Cardiovascular, Pulmonary and Renal. [5 SCH]

This course includes three (3) organ-system segments: Pulmonary, Cardiology and Renal, with the overall theme of examining the homeostatic processes of body and how they become disrupted in disease. Each segment includes learning material in the disciplines of physiology, pathophysiology, anatomy, histology and pharmacology. Sessions are designed jointly by faculty from >1 department to highlight how an integrated view of these 3 organ systems leads to greater skill in differential diagnosis. Students in this course will apply principles of physiology of the lung, heart and kidneys as it relates to disease states, and will review the clinical relevance of basic science material learned in the physiology, anatomy and microbiology courses. Students will also develop a knowledge base about specific diseases states of these organ systems, as well as problem-solving skills that will help them prepare for the experiential component of the curriculum.

Integrated Pathophysiology: Mind, Brain, and Behavior. [4 SCH]

This course is designed to provide an integrative overview of the structure and function of the human brain nervous system, the biological and sociological bases for its susceptibility to neurological and neuropsychiatric disease, and to introduce preclinical students to the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. The course begins with the basic cellular, neurochemical, and electrophysiological foundations of nervous system function in health and disease. From there, the course proceeds with step-by-step explorations of the various sensory, motor and higher order systems of the nervous system and the disorders in which these systems are at risk. Integrated across the systems blocks are physiology, pathology, pharmacology, and therapeutics.

Integrated Pathophysiology: Endocrine and Reproductive. [3 SCH]

Endocrine. The Endocrine course divides naturally into five segments: hypothalamic/pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, diabetes and calcium. Normal endocrine physiology will be followed in each segment by an introduction to endocrine pathophysiology. Reproductive systems. The course integrates normal physiology and pathophysiology of the reproductive organ systems. Integrated across the systems blocks are physiology, histology, pathology, histopathology, pharmacology, and therapeutics.

Integrated Pathophysiology: Gastrointestinal and Nutrition. [3 SCH]

This course provides students with the fundamentals of gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology. There will be an emphasis on problem solving and critical reasoning, as opposed to the passive rote memorization of facts. Integrated across the systems blocks are physiology, pathology, pharmacology, and therapeutics.


 

† Stony Brook University State University of New York School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program has been authorized by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Board of Directors for an on-site evaluation for consideration of pre-candidate status. Authorization of an on-site evaluation for consideration of pre-candidate status does not carry with it nor imply an accreditation status. The on-site evaluation is authorized solely for purposes of gathering additional information in furtherance of an accreditation decision. The Board will consider pre-candidate status at the next regularly scheduled meeting, which occur in January and June of each year, following the on-site evaluation. For an explanation of the ACPE accreditation process, consult the Office of the Dean or the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education, 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, Illinois 60503, 312-644-3575; FAX 866-228-2631; website www.acpe-accredit.org. In addition, the School has made application for approval of the Doctor of Pharmacy program with the New York State Higher Education Department, Office of Licensed Professionals. Students can neither be matriculated into the School nor is the curriculum official until both approvals have been obtained.